TI-Maps 2.2.5 Site 7: Pesticide Storage

APRIL 1988 N60028_000156 TREASURE ISLAND SSIC NO. 5090.3.A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT SITE INSPECTION OF NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND, CA. VOLUME I, II, and III

APRIL 1988 N60028_000156 TREASURE ISLAND SSIC NO. 5090.3.A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT I SITE INSPECTION OF NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND. CA. VOLUME I
 

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2.2.5 Site 7: Pesticide Storage. Building 62, as shown on Figure 2-2, is located in the northeastern section of TI and lies about 250 ft. from the shore. The building has been used for storage and handling of a variety of liquid substances in the past including pesticides, herbicides, paint, and other unidentified fluids. These materials were stored in small, 1 to 5 gallon containers. Pesticides and herbicides were mixed and prepared for use beginning about 1955 until at least the early 1960s. Paints containing linseed oil and lead were apparently mixed on-site near Pier 11 from 1943 to the late 1950s. Excess fluids were disposed by pouring directly onto the ground or storm water drains outside Building 62 to the east and into San Francisco Bay. This practice occurred for approximately 20 years, from 1943 to at least the early 1960s. Relatively small volumes were involved; usually 5-10 gallons per disposal, every 1 to 40 weeks.

In addition, it was reported that sludge from the adjacent wastewater treatment plant (WWT) was spread on the ground in an area bounded by Building 62, the WWT, Avenue M, and 13th Street, about 250 ft by 100 ft in plan dimension. The volume spread was estimated to be up to 10-15 cubic yards per month, total, at this site and at Site 8, potentially spreadinq 960 to 1440 cubic yards of sludqe from 1968 to 1976. The potential exists for organics and metals in the wet sludge to have migrated into the subsurface. Sludge contaminants may be similar to those discharged by the WWT in 1984 which included cyanide, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, silver, zinc, phenolics, and mercury.

The area surrounding Building 62 is almost entirely paved. However, a portion of the possible sludge spreading area is not paved. Contaminant migration pathways would generally be expected to be vertical to the ground water table, carried by percolating surface water, and then horizontal, carried in the ground water to San Francisco Bay. Because the potential exists for contamination from the spread of sludge or the various liquids which were disposed of in the area, Site 7 is recommended for an RI.

3.2.5 Site 7: Pesticide Storage (Figure 3-7)
Type of Sampling: Soil
Number of Soil Borings: 2
Number of Ground Water Monitoring Wells: None
Soil Sampling: 3 samples at each boring
Number of Samples: 6

Test Parameters: Priority Pollutant metals, organochlorine pesticides and PCBs (EPA Method 8080), organophosphorus pesticides (EPA Method 8140), chlorinated herbicides (EPA Method 8150).

Remarks: Obtain samples near the ground surface, at about 2.5 feet depth, and the ground water table (about 5 feet depth). Test all samples in boring nearest Building 62 and the surface sample in the remaining boring for pesticides and herbicides. Analyze all size samples for Priority Pollutant metals.

8.7 SITE 7: PESTICIDE STORAGE. (D7, TI) Building 62 (Figure 8-9) was used for storage and handling of a variety of liquid substances in the past including paint. pesticides. herbicides. and other unidentified fluids. Currently. pesticides and herbicides are distributed by Alameda personnel. The volumes handled were apparently in the 1 to 5 gallon range. Paints were reportedly mixed on-site near Pier 11 from 1943 to the late 1950s and contained linseed oil and lead. Pesticides and herbicides were mixed and prepared for use beginning in about 1955 until at least the early 1960s. Type and mixtures of pesticides and herbicides used on TI and YBI at the time are not known; however. currently used pesticides include boric acid. diazinon, malathion. Decon. rat bait. and endosu1fan. 35-Burgo insecticide is also known to have been applied in 1975 and 1976. Excess fluids were disposed by pouring directly onto the ground outside Building 62 to the east and into San Francisco Bay. This practice occurred for approximately 20 years from 1943 to at least the early 1960s. Relatively small volumes were involved; usually 5-10 gallons per disposal. every 1 to 40 weeks.


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