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Training manuals of the US Navy for Atomic, Biological and Chemical Warfare

I will be adding content to this as there are many training manuals and I will provide links to those online. I have to go through all ofthem. Here are some relating directly to Treasure Island, indicated in the documents.

ABC WARFARE DEFENSE 1960 and 1963 photogaphed at Treasure Island

Photographed on Treasure Island. Notice the Marine Headlands in the background and Alcatraz Island. This is near the Arsenic bubble that the Navy had to clean up , it would be in this picture behind and to the right and right next to the mock up ship the USS Pandemonium.

ABC warfare defense ashore: United States Navy 1060

Continue reading “Training manuals of the US Navy for Atomic, Biological and Chemical Warfare”
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Safety levels of nuclear radiation have changed over the years making previous cleanups are now nuclear accidents

When the government says that a site was cleaned up in the past, remember that the safety standards of the time are nuclear accidents today. It depends on when it was cleaned up. For instance the Nuclear Fuel Rod plant in San Jose was cleaned up to mid 1950s standards when the Atomic Energy Commission was worried about people getting Radiation Poisoniing and not the long term effects of cancer. It is now The Plant shopping center and it has to be re-evaluated for contamination. All of these sites have to be re-examined to determine if people are in danger!

10 CFR § 20.1301 – Dose limits for individual members of the public.
§ 20.1301 Dose limits for individual members of the public.

Source:

REGULATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING AND ACCELERATOR-PRODUCED RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS

NARA
Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
A-Task Force Review NUREG-0301 July 1977

Several lists including the use of radio isotopes and their concentrations in 1977

List of when states took over the regulation of nuclear materials

Cvilian Uses of Radium (Including Radon and RaDEF)

Military Uses of Radium

Selected Accerator-Produced Radionuclides (including some examples of uses)

Primordial Radionuclides

Major Cosmic Ray-Induced Radionuclides

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Admiral B A Clarey NAVFAC gave order in 1972 to remove radium dials from ships

Radiological Precautions
The Navy Civil Engineer
Spring 1972, p. 16

By GLENN ZIMMER Radiological Safety Officer

“Radiological Precautions” By GLENN ZIMMER Radiological Safety Officer The Navy Civil Engineer Spring 1972, p 16

The Radiological Affairs Support Program has been established by the Chief of Naval Material within the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. The CNM has assigned Commander, NAVFAC, the responsibility to act for CNM in matters of radiological affairs. This covers all aspects of ionizing radiation except nuclear propulsion, nuclear weapon criticality, and medical applications within the NMC to, in the words of Adm. B. A. Clarey, “collate, coordinate and monitor — all aspects of radiological controls—.”

Part of this program will be to assure that a uniform program of radiological protection is established within all systems commands, with assistance to the fleets on an “as-required” basis.

Focus Responsibility

Up until now there has not been a coordinated radiological program within the Navy. This has led to conflicting regulations in some cases that has ended with confusion and a lack of control. The aim is to bring central coordination to radiological affairs so that the Navy can assure radiation protection of all personnel within the Navy, and of the environment. This program will include radioactive materials that are used under license authority of the Atomic Energy Commission, those occurring naturally (such as radium), and X-rays.

Heretofore, radium has not been controlled within the Navy, primarily because the use of radium has not been regulated by the Atomic Energy Commission, the U.S. Public Health Service, or any other agency. However, radium is just as harmful as other radioactive materials which have been produced in a reactor, and a control program will be brought into effect on this material.

Industrial use of X-rays is another area that will require attention and control. In the past there has not been a program at all locations for controlling the use of X-rays.

There are needs within the Navy to have instrumentation developed for monitoring to help assure radiological safety. Recommendations will be made from NAVFAC to the appropriate naval activities responsible for development of instrumentation or control procedures.

One of the important reasons for having this program is that it is necessary in the field of radiation protection to have technically-qualified personnel evaluate hazards to personnel and to devise control measures. NAVFAC has a small group of highly-qualified, highly-technical personnel in headquarters and at the Naval Nuclear Power Unit to perform this type of a function.

By having a single central office coordinating radiological affairs and providing technical assistance we can assure radiological control and protection. It is a tremendous responsibility and opportunity for NAVFAC to have been selected to perform this type of a function, because the program is of major importance to the Fleet, and the Navy.

Radiological Precautions
The Navy Civil Engineer
Spring 1975, p. 14

Radiological Precautions” The Navy Civil Engineer Spring 1975, p. 14

Radiological Training Begun • Ft Belvoir, Va.
In June, 1974, the OIC, Naval Nuclear Power Unit (NNPU) was tasked by Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC), with providing radiological training within the U. S. Navy. The Radiological Training Department (RTD) was es- tablished in July, 1974, with the addition of two Medical Service Corps instructor billets from the Chief of Naval Education and Training.

The initial training effort was directed toward the radium removal operations program for inactive Naval vessels. Responsibility for this course was transferred to NNPU following the decommissioning of the Navy Training Unit, Fort McClellan, Ala. The need was established when it was found that many luminescent devices aboard decommissioned ships contained radium in quantities considered excessive and potentially dangerous.

These devices must be removed and properly disposed of prior to transfer of the vessel. The radium removal operations course is designed to enable inactive fleet maintenance personnel to safely locate, remove, and dispose of radioactive materials found aboard inactive ships. Three such courses were conducted in July and August of 1974 with 48 students becoming certified as radium removal operators.

A parallel radium removal course for active ships was then designed in an effort to remove items containing radium from the active fleet and replace them with non-hazardous substitutes. Shore based teams of mainte- nance support personnel have been trained as radium removal operators in an effort to prevent the additional work load from being assigned to shipboard personnel.

Removal and disposal procedures are, therefore, centralized in major home ports where they can be more easily monitored and controlled. Commanding officers can schedule surveys for their ships by submitting a standard work request to the Fleet Main- tenance Assistance Group located in their home port.

The surveys will then be conducted during a convenient in-port period. To date, one course has been conducted on each coast, and radium removal teams are now established in Norfolk, Charleston, Mayport, San Diego, San Francisco, and Pearl Harbor.

Training department personnel have recently completed a nuclear weapons radiological survey operations course – which will enable personnel to conduct radiological surveys in weapons storage areas in ships or shore facilities. Students will learn how to evaluate survey data and determine what actions are necessary in order to ensure current personnel radiation protection standards are met. Classes began in April, 1975, with training being conducted at the Nuclear Weapons Training Groups in Norfolk, Va. Diego, Calif.

Future plans include development and San of a radiation safety officer (RSO) : course which will meet training requirements for individuals filling RS0 billets throughout the Navy. The Course will be approximately two weeks in length and will cover a wide range of subjects including the detection of ionizing radiation, personnel protection measures, the development of standard operating procedures including those for X and gamma ray radiography, and rules and regulations pertaining to radiation sources licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

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Plutonium Cesium Cobalt and neutron sources used in training at Treasure Island

This document lists the resumes with work experience with Plutonium, Cobalt, Cesium, and other radioactive materials and devices. This is a legal document, subjecting the application to comply with all laws and regulations under penalty of perjury.

The Navy would have you believe that the amounts of radiation are small or it’s just Radium. But the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has licenses for all materials used on Treasure Island by the US Navy, including the dates and signatures of all officials who signed under penalty of perjury. This is just one example of many others but a good example of how the record shows the materials used and when.

I will list the isotopes used, the quantities used, the isotope name and half lives for Robert E Sleever.

APPLICATION FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL LICENSE INDUSTRIAL
US Army White Sands Missile Range (WSMR)
12 July 1982

Pages 21 and 22 of 151 show the experience of

ROBERT E. SLEEVER
Quality Assurance Calibration Lab

page 21 of 151of PDF file of
APPLICATION FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL LICENSE INDUSTRIAL
US Army White Sands Missile Range (WSMR)
12 July 1982
page 22 of 151of PDF file of
APPLICATION FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL LICENSE INDUSTRIAL
US Army White Sands Missile Range (WSMR)
12 July 1982
IsotopeMaximum Activityisotope namehalf life
Tl208MicrocuriesThallium 2083 min
Ra226MicrocuriesRadium 2261685 years
Th228MicrocuriesThorium 2281.9 years
Ba233Microcuries
U235MicrocuriesUranium 2357,000,000 years
U238MicrocuriesUranium 2384.47 years
Pu239MicrocuriesPlutonium 23924110 years
Co6030,000 CuriesCobalt 605.27 years
Cs13730,000 CuriesCesium 13730 years
PuBe30,000 CuriesNeutron Source
Mn5430,000 CuriesManganese 54312 days
Co5730,000 CuriesCobalt 57271 days
Zn6530,000 CuriesZinc 65243 days
Kr8530,000 CuriesKrypton 8510.7 years
Y8830,000 CuriesYttrium 88106 days
Sr9030,000 CuriesStrontium 9028.9 years
Tc9930,000 CuriesTechnetium 992110,000 years
Cd10930,000 CuriesCadmium 1091.26 years
I13130,000 CuriesIodine 1318 days
Ba13330,000 CuriesBarium 13310.5 years
Tl20430,000 CuriesThallium 2043.77 years
Bi20730,000 CuriesBismuth 20732.9 years
AmBe30,000 CuriesNeutron Source

This is the table for Alfonzo Gonzales. Note the devices listed with the isotopes, these are containers for the isotopes so they can be used to check the counters for accuracy.

The opening three pages of this document:



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REM and Curie Measurements

REMS

The maximum safe level of radiation for Member of the Public for a year is 100 mrems per year which is:

0.1 rem per year
100 mrems per year
100,000 microrems per year (which is 100,000 µrem)

The maximum safe level of radiation for anyone including radiation workers for an hour is 2 mrems per hour

AmountSymbolName
.0002rems/hrrems per hour
2mrems/hrmillirems per hour
2,000µrem/hrmicrorems per hour
Note in the POST-CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY REPORT the Navy use mR/hr to denote microrems. In other reports they denoted it properly.

The Navy in its spreadsheet listing the radioactive foils used the wrong symbol for microrems. The Navy used mR/h for microrems per hour. The proper symbol is µrem/hr and I will use them in the tables below

There is no safe level for handling radioactive objects with your bare hands, if you pick one up, or come not contact with any radioactive substance there is a risk.

This is particularly important as the radioactive objects found on Treasure island were either thin foils of radioactive materials or objects painted with radium paint. These objects have since rusted away and can be picked up on the wind, so everyone within 4 miles of the island can be exposed to the radiation as it travels in the dust on the wind.

Map showing EPA Distances for exposure for Treasure Island, Fort Mason, the Navy Dispensary on Fell Street and Hunters Point Shipyard. The red lines are 4 miles,, the blue-green is 3 miles, the White is 3 miles and the red is one mile. Note Fell Street’s 1 mile radium is in yellow to denote near neighbors to the Radiation site. All of these sites are nuclear radiation sites in San Francisco. City hall is within range of the Naval Dispensary on Fell Street.

Calculating the Maximum Amount of Radiation for a Member of the Public for a year for an hour.

There are 8760 hours in a year and the people who live on the island, live there all year, so to calculate the hourly rate of a safe dose for a year you get:

100 mrems per year divided by 8760 (hours in a year) comes out to a little over 0.0114 mrems/hr.

I am rounding off to make this easier for everyone to figure out. The real number is 0.0114155251141553

So any radiation amount that is more than 0.0114 mrems per hour will exceed the safe maximum level of radiation for individual members of the public in a year.

0.0114 mrems per hour is:

Amount NumberSymbolName
0.0000114 rems/hrrems per hour
0.0114mrems/hrmillirems per hour
11.4µrem/hr microrems per hour
Note in the POST-CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY REPORT the Navy use mR/hr to denote microrems. In other reports they denoted it properly.

So if you compare the radiation levels for each object in the POST-CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY REPORT December 2019. Table 7 lists the Radium objects in this report on pages 163-185. you can see that the objects listed are below the immediate danger level of 2 mrems per hour so the people will not get radiation sickness. But about 86 of them exceed the yearly dose rate per hour and because each object adds to the total amount of radiation, the people of Treasure Island were exposed to over 60 REMS of nuclear radiation for each year and that is a nuclear accident!

The Navy found these objects in 2013 and placed them in boxes to store them underground instead of removing them when they found the danger. They were required by law to remove them when they found them.

Why didn’t they remove the danger to the residents?

Problem is that radiation goes right through the ground and so the Navy needlessly exposed the residents to this radiation for 5 years until they dug it up and removed it in 2018. See my article

But Wait There’s More:

3.5 mrems per hour which is 30 REMS PER YEAR from Anomaly A-G03/A-CDPH 1303A reported May 26, 2021

Here are the Curie tables based on one Curie of radiation

AmountSymbolName
1Ci/gCurie per gram
1,000mCi/gmillicuries per gram
1,000,000µCi/g microcuries per gram
1,000,000,000nCi/gnanocuries per gram
1,000,000,000,000pCi/gpicocuries per gram
The safe level of radiation for the cleanup is 1.69 pCi/g

The following report and description of the radiological area has a number of objects, I am posting one of them in this article, there are more that also exceed safe levels (one is 49.5 pCi/g found 16 inches below the housing) and the Navy found them in 2013 and have left them there to irradiate the people on treasure Island all of these years. Note they were there for decades but when they knew it was radioactive, they did not start to remove it until 2021. Again I ask Why because they knowingly allowed these people to be exposed to the radiation! That’s murder.

FINAL WORK PLAN
Intrusive Investigation – Radiological Areas of Interest
FORMER NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
May 2021
p 2-2


“Anomaly A-G03/A-CDPH 1303A – Sample location 1303A lies near a concrete walkway adjacent to Building 1303. In March 2013, small discrete particles (3,500 mR/hr. on contact) were collected by CDPH during pre-remediation soil sampling and sent to the Drinking Water and Radiation Laboratory Branch (DWRLB) for analysis. The radioactive fragments were sieved out of the soil sample during sample preparation. CDPH also collected soil samples prior to, during, and after remediation activities. The post-remediation 226Ra sample result (i.e., soil sample collected from the bottom of the excavation) was 1.02 pCi/g (CDPH, 2013). However, during a subsequent investigation conducted in October 2013, LLRO #1282 was found and retrieved and a soil sample collected from the same location detected 226Ra concentrations of 2.2 pCi/g, which is above the NSTI screening criteria of 1.69 pCi/g.”

226Ra is Radium226

1.69 pCi/g is 1.69 picocuries per gram the following tables shows the equivalent amounts:

AmountSymbolName
0.00000000000169Ci/gcuries per gram
0.00000000169mCi/gmillicuries per gram
0.00000169µCi/g microcuries per gram
.00169nCi/gnanocuries per gram
1.69pCi/gpicocuries per gram
The safe level of radiation for the cleanup is 1.69 pCi/g

So if you apply this to the foils of radiation used at the US Treasury/ATF building that was located at Avenue M and Fourth Street in Building 233 at Treasure Island, the NRC noted a violation on the storage and leak checking of radioactive foils made of radioactive Tritium and radioactive Nickle.63 They range from 15 to 6,000 millicuries of radiation.

The 6000 millicuries is 6 Curies of Radiation and was used in the Sentex Sensing Technology, Inc. Model 50319 Detector Cell with each foil measuring 150 millicuries of radiation but the device used 40 of them.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission noted many violations on Treasure island. In this case it was violation from 6/23/1987 which was for not leak checking the radiation in these devices and receiving radioactive foils that were not meant to be shipped to them. The ATF had two labs, one in Rockville MD and the other at Treasure Island.

Note that this license was being evaluated while the Navy was writing the 1988 Radiological Survey report for the EPA. No mention of the long term radioactive materials. Nickel63 has a half life of 100.1 years while Tritium has a half life of 12.3 years.

So 150 millicuries of radiation is equivalent to these amounts:

AmountSymbolName
0.150Ci/gcuries per gram
150mCi/gmillicuries per gram
150,000µCi/g microcuries per gram
150,000,000nCi/gnanocuries per gram
150,000,000,000pCi/gpicocuries per gram
The safe level of radiation for the cleanup is 1.69 pCi/g

The Navy underrated the level of contamination in 2013 saying it was safe leaving it there to contaminate the residents when later on they found it exceeded the safe levels of radiation.

So there are four issues here that affects both lists of radiological objects found, and remember this is just two reports, there are more reports of objects found that have to be added to the total amount of radiation on the island:

1. They found radiation in 2013 and did not dig it up until now thus exposing the residents to radiation for years and that exposure is at least 90 REMS per year, a nuclear accident.
2. The Navy admits that they goofed up when they first measured the radiation in 2013, reporting it far less than what it actually is today, so that puts into question the amounts of radiation of all radiation readings on the island.
3. The levels of radiation exceed the safe levels of 100 mrems per year and 2 mrems per hour making the site a nuclear disaster site.
4. These radioactive objects were found buried with bombs and ammunition so if a bomb blows up, the radiation gets spread over a large area in the wind.

The City needs to evacuate these people immediately and stop all construction on the island, because to place people to live there is murder.

Letter to the Navy in response to August 10 2021 RAB meeting

Dear Ms. Linz:
Can you send this to the meeting members
The Naval Research Laboratory conducted tests using mustard gas at Treasure Island to test the use of Decontamination Solution 2 versus DANC to be used in chemical warfare training on all navy bases. Mustard Gas was plentiful because the Navy was conducting chemical warfare training at Treasure Island.

https://treasureislandcalifornia.wordpress.com/2021/01/19/ti-the-smoking-gun-chemical-warfare-test-at-treasure-island-navy-evaluates-methods-use-to-clean-up-mustard-gas/

DANC is tetrachloroethane and RH195 powder which is a very concentrated form of Chlorine. The Navy at the time used the TCE for the tetrachloroethane when today we use it for Trichloroethylene which are both toxic in parts per million. They mixed 25 gallons at a time in metal garbage cans and dumped it directly onto the ground.

These photographs are from that article and their references are linked.

The training manual ABC Warfare Defense 1960 and 1963 were photographed on Treasure Island. You can see Alcatraz and the Golden Gate and the Marin Headlands in the background of the decontamination of the field gun photograph.

DS2 is
70 Percent Diethylenetriamine (DETA
28-percent methyl Cellosolve
2-percent sodium hydroxide by weight, also known as Lye or Caustic Soda.

DS2 was also dumped all over the ground and used on trucks, field guns, and the first USS Pandemonium which was located on Gateway Avenue right about where Kevin Elizabeth Kempf lives.

DS2 was so corrosive it required the repainting of the guns, trucks and vehicles used in the training , hence the need for auto hobby shops and bus painting facilities to repaint them for the next set of students. Later just painting over the vehicles was a way to contain the contamination but this presents a serious problem, what happened to those vehicles?

I have been going through the Navy reports starting with Operation Crossroads where on December 10, 1946 the Navy admitted to dumping radioactive sand from sand blasting and the radioactive acid from cleaning the pipes of the ships contaminated at the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll directly into San Francisco Bay and the order was given for all bays and harbors on the west coast and the Pacific making sure to not inform the barges that the content was radioactive so as to not cause a panic and in the process exposed the ecosystem to the contaminants directly.

https://disasterarea.home.blog/2020/10/18/dumping-nuclear-waste-directly-into-san-francisco-bay-and-used-as-fill-in-treasure-island-how-the-little-girl-found-fallout-in-her-treasure-box-the-cover-up-navy-report-10-december-1946/

Code 180 A
All/Crossroads/S99
S-E-C-R-E-T

NAVY DEPARTMENT
Bureau of Ships
Washington 25, D.C.

10 December 1946

MEMORANDUM

Subject: Conference on Radiological Safety; Report of.
Time: 0910, 27 November 1946.
Place: Navy Department, Bureau of Ships Room T3-2703.

Present: R.Adm.SOLBERG (BuShips) Col. NICHOLS (ManhatDist)
Capt. MAXWELL (BuShips) Col. ROPER (ManhatDist)
Cdr. REE (BuShips) Col. FIELDS (ManhatDist)
Cdr. HOFFMAN (BuShips ) Col. COONEY (RadSafe)
WesCoRep.) Capt.LYON (BuMed)
Cdr. LANGER (BuShips) Dr. HAMILTON (Univ.Calif)
Cdr. HAWES (BuShips)

So you see you should be looking for more chemicals and radiation in the Bay and on Treasure Island. The Army did it right and published their decontamination of the Edgewood Arsenal that also conducted the same training. You can learn from them! They did this with the EPA.

DTSC says that Treasure Island is unique for people living on a radiation site. It is unique to the DTSC but the EPA has 40 years of experience cleaning up nuclear radiation with people living on the site and you know what they did, they evacuated them!

I have been documenting the USNRDL technical reports where they were charged with decontamination of radiation in live fire incidents where the Navy purposely contaminated areas in Hunters Point Shipyard, Treasure Island, San Bruno and Camp Stoneman (Pittsburg CA) and Camp Parks (Dublin CA). The reports span the foundation of the lab all the way up to the late 1960s when the shipyard was determining the effect of sea water at depth on the SNAP portable nuclear reactors which were used in spacecraft (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo as well as satellites) and since the Navy was testing them at depth I am guessing sonar buoys?

Quite frankly I cannot see how you can justify placing people onto these sites.

There is a list of chemicals that were listed on site T117 in the Baseline report from 1994 and here is the link. The city placed the Treasure Island Skatepark between the Hazardous waste facility for Treasure Island when it was a base and the Radium Vault located on the other side of the building that forms the south wall of the skatepark. (between 343 and 342) You could not have picked a worse location for kids and young adults.

https://treasureislandcalifornia.wordpress.com/2021/08/02/treasure-island-radium-vault-and-hazardous-waste-facility-at-ti-skatepark/

Your contractors who are sampling the locations need to know that this history has taken place and adjust their sampling methods to search for this contamination and to warn them for their own personal safety of the types of contaminants present. One thing that needs to be said, and that is the people on the ground who are cleaning this up and the TIDA Members, the Navy, the staff and officials at City Hall, anyone who has stepped foot on these bases has been contaminated. It is not just the residents. So for your own health you need to investigate further before you subject 20000 more people to the contamination.

James Pepper

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Navy denial of radiation on Treasure Island – the paper trail of the lie

The Navy has denied that any radiological activity took place on Treasure Island even when they have found 60 Rems per year of Radium from the top 10 inches of soil under the public housing on the site and just recently in May 2021 they found another 30 REMS per year of nuclear radiation under the public housing on the site. They originally made these claims while the Radiological School was still in operation on the Island, so there is no excuse, THEY LIED and the politicians have used this lie to perpetrate a fraud on the people of San Francisco, leaving them holding the bag for the cleanup.!

BASEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR
NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND
CONTRACT N62474-92-D-3607
DELIVERY ORDER (0005)
Prepared For:
Engineering Field Activity West
Naval Facilities Engineering Command
San Bruno, California
May 19, 1995

BASEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR
NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND

Parcel Identification Map page 17 of 69 in PDF file

This report resides in multiple PDF files on the Envirostor Database and so there will be many links and it is the denial that was used to whitewash the 1995 report to deny any radiological activity but in the fine print it says the direct opposite, citing dumping of radioactive waste on the site where two examples are listed below and other references to the radiation can be found using a simple search of the documents.

The Paper Trail – the following is a list of people and their correspondence who made the false statement in the report that here was no radioactive materials buried on the island.

Page 2-9 is on PDF file page 55 of 69

“Radioactive Materials/Mixed Wastes. File information was reviewed to identify parcels where radioactive materials/mixed wastes were stored and the period of time they were stored. EFA WEST also provided information to ERM-West regarding radiological activities for all of the parcels on Treasure and Yerba Buena Islands. This information was obtained through the Naval Sea Systems Command Detachment, Radiological Affairs Support Office (RASO). A description of the material was included in the database.”

Page 4-8 p 26 of 35 in this PDF file

This is the letter that DTSC uses to claim no radiation at the site. This paragraph is in reference to a chart of each building and areas defined in the map (above) found at the beginning of the document that broke up Treasure Island into 120 separate areas and another 26 on YBI and this chart has no indication of radiation, no checkmarks in the radiation tab for each site. Why would they have it as an item if there are no checkmarks on it anywhere unless the report was censored?

There are other references to the USS Pandemonium and radiological training on Treasure Island in this overall baseline report. Again I want to emphasize that the reports conclusions do not match up with the content in the document.

Note T102 is the location of the first USS Pandemonium where they lost the Radium Needles and Radium materials (see below)

“Radioactive Materials/Mixed Wastes.  A check mark indicates that radioactive materials or mixed wastes are currently or were formerly used, stored, or disposed of on the parcel. This condition may preclude a parcel from being considered for CERFA-eligibility. Radiological issues were of particular concern to regulatory agencies for BRAC classification. Therefore, in addition to the review of on-site records, EFA WEST requested that RASO search for information on known and potential uses of radioactive materials at the base. RASO concurrence is required prior to nomination for CERFA, for lease, or for transfer. In a March 8, 1995, letter from Lt. Commander Heron of EFA WEST, to Mr. David Wang of DTSC, RASO concluded that there is no potential for residual contamination at NAVSTA TI (NSTI) as a result of licensed activities and no radioactive materials were disposed of on site. This conclusion from RASO applies to all parcels at NSTI and is documented in the results and bibliographic reference databases (Appendices A and B, respectively).”


NAVSTA TREASURE ISLAND LIST OF REFERENCES

Continue reading “Navy denial of radiation on Treasure Island – the paper trail of the lie”

Treasure Island Radium Vault and Hazardous Waste Facility at TI Skatepark – Update

The Radium Vault is a place the Navy stored radioactive Materials underground in a bunker that is a Hot Cell, a place of storage and mixing radioactive materials. It is located on the other side of the building from the Treasure Island Skatepark and TIDA knew this when they allowed the Skateboarders to build there. This may be the most radioactively impacted site on the base as it was used to store Radium, Plutonium, Cesium 137, Cobalt 60, Strontium and other radioactive materials.

Radioactive materials used during facility operation have included
Potassium-42, Sodium-24, Radium-226, Cesium-137, Bromine-80 and 82, and,
Plutonium-239 compounds (Table 5-1). Use of Radium-226 was discontinued by the Navy in 1984. Radioactive materials currently are stored in Building 344
adjacent to Building 343. p 5-8 Source:

TREASURE ISLAND PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT I SITE INSPECTION OF NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND. CA. SSIC NO. 5090.3.A APRIL.1988; N60028_000156; NAVAL ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUPPORT ACTIVITY Port Hueneme. California 93043

Note Plutonium is an Alpha emitter and the only way to reliably confirm this is by using swabs to get it and then test it in a lab. Alpha contamination is also found in the Radium and this is particularly dangerous as alpha particles can get inside of you and slowly give you cancer over time. Bone cancers, lung cancer and blood cancers, are the most common types but it is particularly bad in young people still growing as it affects them much worse than adults. This is why when TIDA put the skatepark there knowing the location was next to the radium vault, that is murder. You can see the TIDA board with all smiles giving the Skateboarders permission to build their skatepark on the contaminated site. in the video at the end of this article.

Google Map if you zoom out of the map you can see the proximity to the Treasure Island Skatepark.

The bunker is that broken structure between the two buildings, it is a Hot Cell an underground bunker where you store nuclear materials, radioactive isotopes and the Navy is trying to tear it down but it is a bunker designed to safely store radioactive materials so all they can do is chip away at it. This is something you don’t want to be chipping away at, as it is radioactive in the extreme! Matt Smith found Cesium 137 on this site.

As you can see in this photograph that shows the hydraulic training school building and the damage control building, the entrance to the underground bunker is between the two buildings and the Navy is trying to remove it but it is well made and I will have an article on the construction of these buildings as the Navy published the regulations on how to build underground radiation and chemical bunkers.

And this photograph below is from the 1994 Baseline survey report showing the bunker properly identified between the two buildings.

page 55 of 83
BASEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND CONTRACT N62474-92-D-3607 DELIVERY ORDER (0005) Prepared For: Engineering Field Activity West Naval Facilities Engineering Command San Bruno, California May 19, 1995 
Radium Vault Structure 344 near the Hydraulic Training School buildings 342 and 343 to the left (North) on this map.
The Treasure Island Skatepark is located immediately to the left (North) of the former building 342 in the tennis courts in area 367. Building to the upper left of the tennis courts was used to store Hazardous Waste sent to disposal
Naval Station Treasure Island, San Francisco, California Phase II Ecological Risk Assessment
Draft Work Plan
Prepared by PRC Environmental Management, Inc. December 19, 1994


The following includes a list of chemicals that were located on the Hazardous Waste Facility on Treasure Island which makes up the East side of the property next to the Treasure Island Skatepark and it indicates the Radium Vault (344 on the map) which is next to the Hydraulic Training School (342) and on M Avenue near 5th Street. The Radium Vault information is here:

BASEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND CONTRACT N62474-92-D-3607 DELIVERY ORDER (0005) Prepared For: Engineering Field Activity West Naval Facilities Engineering Command San Bruno, California May 19, 1995  . page 5-253 p 253 of 302 in the PDF file

“Radioactive materials were stored at Structure 344 (radium vault) between 1961 and 1971. Quantities stored are unknown.” page 5-255 BASEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND CONTRACT N62474-92-D-3607 DELIVERY ORDER (0005) Prepared For: Engineering Field Activity West Naval Facilities Engineering Command San Bruno, California May 19, 1995

Treasure Island Development Authority allowed the placement of the Treasure Island Skatepark on the abandoned Tennis courts without telling the Skatepark founders that the Island was the site of the US NAVY’s Atomic, Biological and Chemical Warfare School and that the site is contaminated with nuclear and chemical waste.

The unsuspecting builders of the Treasure Island Skatepark used the lot directly to the East of the site of the Skatepark for raw materials, using earth to build up ramps and they drove the Concrete Truck across that field in order to build the ramps on the Skatepark, Here is a video of them doing that and watch as the Treasure Island Development Authority let them do it and fail to tell them the risks:https://youtu.be/xzkqlayu0MA

I will be updating this list with more information including the concentration amounts of the chemicals that were sent to the GSA on Naval Air Station Alameda to be sold to the highest bidder. That’s right, the Navy sold off its toxic waste to the highest bidder, some of the most dangerous materials on the face of the earth including the residue of chemical weapons training.

BASEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR NAVAL STATION TREASURE ISLAND, CONTRACT N62474-92-D-3607 DELIVERY ORDER (0005) Prepared For: Engineering Field Activity West Naval Facilities Engineering Command San Bruno, California, May 19, 1995 pp 5-476-479

zirconium chloride (100 lbs./yr)
recyclable wastes (100 tons /yr)
hazardous waste (130 tons/yr)
4,4-methylenedis(2-chloroanimine) with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
adhesives, paints, solvents, toluene, 1,4-diisocyanate with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr); PCBs, including transformer articles, capacitors, ballasts,
and debris (1,000 to 100,000 lbs./yr)
potassium superoxide, sodium chlorate, barium dioxide, potassium hydroxide, and metal casings (500,000 to 1,000,000 lbs./yr)
magnesium and inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr); dimethyl sulfate with inert
components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
mercury vapor residue with metal and glass debris (10,000 to 100,000 lbs./yr); trimethyl ammonium resin (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
hydrochloric acid with water (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
plastic bags with OBA residue, which includes potassium hydroxide, potassium superoxide, barium dioxide, sodium chlorate, and debris; lithium batteries, which contain lithium metal, trace solvents, plastic/nickel casing and acetonitrile (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
mercury with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
nickel/cadmium batteries, which contain cadmium hydroxide, nickel hydroxide, cobalt hydroxide, potassium hydroxide, water, and packaging (1,000 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
hydrofluoric acid and water (1,000 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
emergency escape breathing apparatia, which contain sodium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, barium peroxide, lithium hyderoxide, and casing material (1,000 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
sodium cyanide, organic acid, water, and metals (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
sodium aside with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr); magnesium batteries, which contain
zinc metal, magnesium dioxide, mercuric chloride, zinc compound, ammonium chariot, water, and inert
materials (1,000 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
selenium compounds (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
beryllium, brake shoes/parts, rags, and clothing (500 to 10,000 lbs. /yr)
sodium cyanide with inert components (1,500 lbs./yr)
sodium arsenite with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
calcium hypochlorite with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
sodium hypochlorite with inert components (500 to 10,000 Ibs/yr)
methyl isocyanate with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
mercuric chloride with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
hydrazine with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
hypochlorite salts with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr)
lithium hydroxide with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs./yr);

sodium peroxide with inert components (500 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
vinyl chloride with inert component (500 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
potassium metal with inert component (500 to 10,000 Ibs/yr)
lithium metal with inert component (500 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
hydroiodic acid with inert component (100 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
hydrocyanic acid, phosphoric acid, and inert component (100 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
sodium bifluoride with inert component (500 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
mercury salts with inert component (100 to 10,000 lbs/yr)
cyanide salts with inert component (100 to 10,000 Ibs/yr);
hydrobramic acid with inert component (100 to 10,000 Ibs/yr)
sodium metal (10 to 100 Ibs/yr)
sulfuric acid and casing (1,000 to 10,000 Ibs/yr)
lead acid batteries, which contain lead and arsenic (1,000 to 10,000 Ibs/quarter)
chlorine gas (150 Ibs /yr)
selenious acid, curie nitrate, nickel sulfate, and inert components (100 to 1,000 Ibs/yr)
calcium metal (10 to 100 Ibs/yr)
white phosphorus with water (20 Ibs/yr)
yellow phosphorus (20 Ibs/yr).

During the site inspection, the following types and
quantities of hazardous waste were identified in the
southern portion of Parcel T1l7:
four safes and filing cabinets with asbestos-containing material
one 55gallon drum of mercury and silver amalgam
one 5 gallon drum of lubricants
one 55-gallon drum of film
one 5-gallon drum of toner
two 55-gallon drums of lead
one 55-gallon drum of empty propane cylinders
one 55-gallon drum and one 5-gallon drum of petroleum naphtha
one 55-gallon drum of trichloroethylene/ benzene.
Although these wastes were properly segregated, there was no secondary containment system.

The Skatepark was put together using found items including dirt from the neighboring areas. This video section starts with the Concrete Truck driving across the field used to store Hazardous waste to get to the site of the tennis court they used for the skatepark