Treasure Island Development Authority hearing April 15, 2021

Hearing transcript Treasure Island Development Authority hearing April 15 1:00 PM San Francisco:

I am James Pepper.

I am looking at the 1994 U.S. geological survey deep instrumentation array at the treasure island naval station. The lateral stress was six times that of — because of the sand. The effect of the earthquake was six times that of other areas in the bay area.

I hope you all address that .It is in the name of the overall report as being the October 17, 1989 earthquake. Ground motion and ground failure report.

The other thing when you were pounding away on the causeway. Did you all file a permission to do that with the fish and wildlife and the Marine Mammal Commission?
That is the area where the seals feed.

>> sure. May I address the question?

>> yes, please.

>>

URI ELIAHU: So, with regard to the first comment: Yes, there’s a USGS seismic array that’s north of this Stage One area and sort of towards the west edge of the island, and it recorded ground motions during Loma Prieta and other less significant earthquakes. And the seismic response – that is, the lateral acceleration that occurred at the surface of Treasure Island — was significantly greater than it was on Yerba Buena Island because of the amplification that occurs through the soil profile and the bedrock.  To put it in perspective, the peak ground  acceleration that was recorded was, if I recall correctly, on the order of “point one-two gee” (.12g) – that is “point one-two times the acceleration of gravity.”  It’s in that range.  And, the design that we design to is four times that.  It’s about “point four six (.460) feet,” because we are designing for a much higher intensity event.  We’re sitting between the Hayward and San Andreas faults, and so we’re way beyond the measured ground motions in the bay area.

As to the second question about the causeway: We said in the beginning that that sand needed to be densified with dynamic energy.  There are two ways to do that.  One is impact which I think is what the caller is referring to, and the other is vibration.  We chose vibration and not impact, and a significant part of the reason was just what was  stated.  We really didn’t want to have effects that would go beyond the prism of soil that was being improved.  And, to put that in perspective, the efficacy of that system is only about 6 feet away from the vibratory columns that we saw in the presentation.  So, it dissipates very quickly.  It only improves the specific area where it is applied, unlike big impact energy which has waves that propagate much further out.

Thanks to Carol Harvey for typing out the response from URI ELIAHU. I was using the closed captioning file from the City’s website.


[Editors Note: So the answer is no, they did not get permission from the Marine Mammal Commission to do the causeway.]

TI and USNRDL 1966 Congressional Hearing to consolidate housing onto Treasure Island and build animal facility at Shipyard

The following testimony is to consolidate all the locations where Navy Personnel live onto Treasure Island and the people who set this in motion creating the mess we are in today! The Admirals also asked the Congress for appropriations to build a new animal facility at the USNRDL, the US NAVY Radiological Defense Lab at the San Francisco Shipyard (Hunters Point Shipyard).

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Appropriations. (1965). Military construction appropriations for 1966: Hearings, Eighty-ninth Congress, first session. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off.. 45-46, 115-122, 167-172, 304-306

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Military Construction, Department of the Navy

REAR ADM. HARRY HULL, U.S. NAVY, DIRECTOR, SHORE ACTIVITIES DEVELOPMENT AND CONTROL DIVISION, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS
REAR ADM. PETER CORRADI, U.S. NAVY, CHIEF, BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS Continue reading “TI and USNRDL 1966 Congressional Hearing to consolidate housing onto Treasure Island and build animal facility at Shipyard”

TI-1960 Naval Reserve Research Company 12-2 Presents Nuclear Seminar

“Naval Reserve Research Company 12-2 Presents Nuclear Seminar” United States. Office of Naval Research. (1960). Naval research reviews. [Washington, D.C.]: Office of Naval Research. October 1960 p. 27 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b3044464&view=1up&seq=379

Naval Reserve Research Company 12-2 Presents Nuclear Seminar

Over sixty reserve officers attended the Nuclear Weapon-Nuclear Explosive Seminar at the Naval Base on Treasure Island, San Francisco, California, on 20–21 August 1960. Reserve officers under training duty orders from the Navy, Army, and Air Force came from as far as Utah, and many from Research Reserve Companies in the San Francisco Bay area were in attendance. Among the civilian professions represented were physicists, engineers, university and high school teachers—all of whom provided a stimulating cross section of ideas during the Saturday and Sunday sessions Continue reading “TI-1960 Naval Reserve Research Company 12-2 Presents Nuclear Seminar”

TI-ABC Warfare Defense – Four Weeks Course for Medical Officers January 1959

ABC Warfare Defense – Four Weeks Course for Medical Officers

Course #3 – convening 5 January 1959

Location: U.S. Naval Schools Command, Naval Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, Calif.
Student Clearance Required: SECRET
Reporting Time and Place: Prior to 2200, 4 January 1959, Personnel Office, U.S. Naval Schools Command, Bldg. 28

Course Objectives: This course is designed for experienced active duty Naval Medical officers possessing SECRET security clearance. It will stress the medical aspects of modern warfare and of military peace time operations, including problems incident to atomic, biological and chemical weapons systems, nuclear propulsion, mass casualties and isotopes programs. Military aspects of the weapons systems and military countermeasures will also be considered so that medical officers may function effectively on a staff and can reasonably assess the medical compromises imposed by the military situation. Outstanding speakers, both military and civilian, will be on the program. The course will include visits to the Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory and the Naval Biological Laboratory, and will include several practical exercises and drills. Texts will be provided for permanent retention by the students. Continue reading “TI-ABC Warfare Defense – Four Weeks Course for Medical Officers January 1959”

TI-Training Course in Special Weapons, Isotopes, and Military Medicine for Reserve Medical and Dental Officers 1955

Medical News Letter, 12 December 1954; Vol 24, Number 12, Editor Captain L. B. Marshall, MC, USN (Retired) United States. Navy Department. Washington: U.S. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery pp 24-25
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015072921003?urlappend=%3Bseq=468

Training Course in Special Weapons, Isotopes, and Military Medicine for Reserve Medical and Dental Officers

The fourth annual course, “Special Weapons, Isotopes and Military Medicine,” will be sponsored by the Inspector, Naval Medical Activities, Pacific Coast, and presented by the Commandant, Twelfth Naval District, during the period 28 February – 4 March 1955, at the U. S. Naval Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, Calif. Continue reading “TI-Training Course in Special Weapons, Isotopes, and Military Medicine for Reserve Medical and Dental Officers 1955”

TI-Special Weapons, Isotopes and Professional Subjects February 27,1956

United States. Navy Department. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. “U.S. Navy medicine.”. Washington: U.S. Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. V.26 Number 3; 5 August 1955. P 24:
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015072921029?urlappend=%3Bseq=112

Special Weapons, Isotopes and Professional Subjects – 5 days.

To be conducted at the U. S. Naval Station, Treasure Island, San Francisco, Calif. , February 27, 1956, for the 11th, 12th, and 13th Naval Districts. An up-to date review of problems and information relating to the various medical aspects of special weapons and radioactive isotopes, with primary emphasis on their application to military and naval dentistry and civil defense will be presented.